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Parking permit plan put out to pasture

A staff report detailing a possible parking permit system in Mission has been deemed too impractical and expensive by council.

The report, produced Monday at regular council, was requested back in February when politicians asked about logistics and estimated costs.

Using an estimated area of 26 kilometres, the capital costs to erect signs would be $104,000, with annual operating costs of just under $100,000. Fines and permits would only recoup $21,500 each year, making for an annual loss of over $77,000.

"This would create bureaucracy and cost money, the worst of both worlds," said Coun. Paul Horn, who led a motion to look at neighbourhood permits on an as-needed basis, with capital cost-neutrality, and public consultation before implementation.

"I personally believe the parking issue has always been in areas of secondary suites," said Mayor James Atebe, particularly in cul-de-sacs where parking is scarce.

Some areas of Mission, such as Fifth Avenue east of Stake Lake Street, already utilize permit parking.

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