Dr. Kim Chi, chief medical officer at BC Cancer, says donor support plays a vital role when it comes to research and breakthroughs in cancer care.

Changing the outcome through philanthropy

Donor support plays a vital role when it comes to cancer breakthroughs

It’s a startling statistic: one in two British Columbians will face cancer in their lifetime.

Thanks to the generosity of BC Cancer Foundation donors, philanthropy is helping to move the dial on cancer research and care in B.C.

Experts at BC Cancer are continuing to break down cancer in the labs and in the clinics, and change the outcome for thousands of families affected by the disease.

Donor support plays a vital role when it comes to the latest cutting-edge research and breakthroughs in cancer care, according to Dr. Kim Chi, chief medical officer at BC Cancer.

“We’ve made great strides in advancing cancer care — people are living longer and there are more people getting cured from their cancers than ever before,” says Dr. Chi. “This would not happen without donors.”

For 17-year-old Michelle Reilly, the latest in personalized cancer medicine has provided her with more time to spend with family and friends after a devastating Glioblastoma Multiforme diagnosis in September 2018.

After her diagnosis, Michelle was enrolled in BC Cancer’s Personalized Onco-Genomics (POG) Program, where a sample of her tumour was analyzed. The results revealed an innovative treatment option: an immunotherapy clinical trial that would be infused once every two weeks.

While on her new treatment, Michelle showed great progress and her tumour shrank. Unfortunately, seven months later, her cancer progressed again.

Michelle and her mother Carla are optimistic Michelle’s care team will once again use crucial pieces of information from her POG analysis to provide her with another treatment option.

“For me, the science and advancements make me really hopeful for the future — even if it doesn’t pan out for Michelle, we feel it’s all worthwhile for future pediatric patients,” says Carla.

Funded by BC Cancer Foundation donors, the POG Program is changing the way cancer is diagnosed and treated, proving that genomics — the study of the human genome — can transform cancer treatment and therapies.

It’s just one example of how donor support is ensuring British Columbians have access to the latest in cancer care, including innovative therapies, which was the fundraising focus of the BC Cancer Foundation’s Jingle Mingle event in November.

“Donors enable cutting-edge research to be taking place here in British Columbia,” says Dr. Chi. “Every little bit helps to drive forward the research that we do here at BC Cancer.”

This Dec. 3 on Giving Tuesday, donors have an opportunity to double their impact, as Murray and Lynda Farmer, longtime BC Cancer supporters, will be generously matching donations up to $50,000 to advance world-leading innovative therapies at BC Cancer.

To learn how you can have your donation matched and help save lives in our community, visit: www.bccancerfoundation.com/giving.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Seventeen-year-old Michelle Reilly and her mother Carla are optimistic the BC Cancer care team will continue to provide them with treatment options for Michelle’s Glioblastoma Multiforme.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

B.C. firefighters only responding to most life-threatening calls during COVID-19 pandemic

The directive comes after province spoke with paramedics, fire services, according to top doctor

Two inmates found positive for COVID-19 at Mission Institution; two other tests pending

15 staff self-isolating waiting results, says correctional officer

‘An extra $220 every 90 days’: B.C. patients pay more dispensing fees due to prescription limits

Kelowna woman says it’s outrageous to charge for refills every 30 days

COLUMN: The other graph that shows B.C. can beat COVID-19

Is the curve being flattened? data on hospitalizations provides a crucial answer.

Goose in Abbotsford rescued after legs wrapped up in fishing line

Wildlife centre operator says people need to be more careful

‘Better days will return’: Queen Elizabeth delivers message amid COVID-19 pandemic

The Queen said crisis reminds her of her first address during World War II in 1940

Emergency aid portal opens Monday, cash could be in bank accounts by end of week: Trudeau

Emergency benefit will provide $2,000 a month for those who have lost their income due to COVID-19

Education, not enforcement: B.C. bylaw officers keeping a watch on physical distancing

A kind word, it turns out, has usually been all people need to hear

COVID-19: Hospitals remain safe for childbirth, say Vancouver Island care providers

North Island Hospital has been asked to share its perinatal COVID-19 response plan

Insurance shock for B.C. condo owners

Claim-free two-year-old townhouse complex told premium will nearly triple

Canadian cadets to mark 103rd anniversary of Vimy Ridge April 9 virtually

Idea of Captain Billie Sheridan in Williams Lake, B.C. who wondered what to do in times of COVID-19

B.C. VIEWS: Pandemic shows need for adequate care home staffing

Seniors in B.C. care homes face challenging times

Most Read