Blanket BC Society’s founding members Gregory Ould (left) and his son Benjamin, along with his daughter Emma (not pictured), were honoured this week with a traditional Blanketing Ceremony by the Kwantlen First Nation. / Submitted Photos

Blanket BC Society’s founding members Gregory Ould (left) and his son Benjamin, along with his daughter Emma (not pictured), were honoured this week with a traditional Blanketing Ceremony by the Kwantlen First Nation. / Submitted Photos

Mission blanket-givers become receivers after attending special ceremony

Blanket BC Society’s founders were honoured by Kwantlen First Nation

Blanket BC Society’s founding members – Gregory Ould, his son Benjamin and daughter Emma, who live in Mission – were honoured Tuesday in a traditional Blanketing Ceremony by the Kwantlen First Nation.

The event took place at St. Catherine’s Catholic Elementary School in Langley.

Ould and his children, now 14 and 11 years old, have been working diligently over the years spreading warmth to any and all who need it.

The honour – a first for the Ould family – was bestowed by Kevin Kelly (husband of Chief Marilyn Gabriel) on behalf of her and the Kwantlen Nation.

The purpose of this special assembly is a way to tie things together for the students, community, and First Nations people, and honour the three connections with “clothing the naked” and “sheltering the homeless.”

The ceremony follows Blanket BC’s successful 10th annual Drive on the Line, which took place on Nov. 16 and 17 along SkyTrain’s Canada Line in Vancouver and Richmond.

More than 5,000 blankets, 1,200 articles of clothing and a record-setting $8,000 were collected over the course of the two-day event. More than 3,000 of those blankets were handed out the following day.

About the Blanket BC Society:

“I could use a blanket, to survive the night” is the phrase that started it all. After giving one blanket to a homeless man 13 years ago, Blanket BC has grown from a father/son/daughter project to a non-profit organization that has delivered over 400,000 blankets to date.

Their mission is to provide “warmth from the heart” throughout the year by collecting blankets and warm clothing for shelter programs, families in need, and First Nations communities.

They raise awareness about homelessness, poverty and social economic issues alongside promoting volunteerism at a young age.

 

Mission blanket-givers become receivers after attending special ceremony