Commercial production of medical marijuana is ramping up but physicians want better scientific evidence on when to prescribe it.

B.C. doctors want clarity on prescribing medical marijuana

Clinical trials, tests urged so pot can be treated 'like any other pharmaceutical'

B.C. doctors want the federal government to clear the haze around when they can appropriately prescribe medical marijuana.

Dr. William Cunningham, past president of Doctors of B.C. (formerly the B.C. Medical Association), said Health Canada should fund in-depth studies to generate scientific evidence on the proper medical use of cannabis.

He said Ottawa has so far shown little interest in conducting clinical trials and tests to  clarify the key issues of concern to physicians – which patients should and should not use marijuana, what the correct dosage is, and what dangerous interactions might arise in combination with other medications.

“It would be much better if government studied it properly and it was treated like any other pharmaceutical agent,” Cunningham said.

He spoke in response to the release this fall of preliminary guidelines by the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

The guidelines advise doctors to only authorize medical marijuana for patients with chronic nerve pain who haven’t found relief through other treatments.

The college concluded medical pot isn’t appropriate for people under 25, those with a history of psychosis or substance abuse, or for treatment of insomnia or anxiety.

The Arthritis Society has also called for research to determine if cannabis is effective in controlling arthritis pain and, if so, what’s the best delivery method.

The society says large numbers of authorized medical marijuana users are arthritis sufferers.

B.C. doctors are under growing pressure from the public to prescribe pot but many have refused to do so due to concerns about liability and the lack of acceptable scientific evidence.

Other pot-friendly doctors actively court the medical marijuana business, some running web clinics that offer rapid approvals via video conference.

“That is a huge concern,” Cunningham said. “I don’t think anybody should be doing that by Skype or FaceTime without examining the patient.”

Federal policy has put doctors in a very difficult position of being expected to prescribe a drug that is not authorized for therapeutic use, he added.

Nearly 40,000 Canadians are believed to use marijuana for medical purposes.

Commercial producers are building medical marijuana factories that Ottawa intends to make the sole legal sources.

But a court challenge of the new federal policy is expected to be heard next year and previously licensed users hope to retain their ability to grow their own marijuana.

Cunningham said Doctors of B.C. is also supporting the development of screening tools to detect drivers impaired by marijuana.

Just Posted

Local ballet students selected for top schools

Twelve successfully audition from Fraser Valley Academy of Dance

BREAKING: Clearbook Library evacuated due to bomb threat

Abbotsford Police continuing to investigate for remainder of the day

‘Beauty amongst such tragedy:’ B.C. photographer captures nature’s trifecta

David Luggi’s photo from a beach in Fraser Lake shows Shovel Lake wildfire, Big Dipper and an aurora

Air quality advisory continues in the Lower Mainland

Smoke from Interior fires brings fine particulate

MNET Radio Music Festival 18 comes to Mission

Event on Aug. 24 and 25, but Thunderfest first on Aug. 18

‘We will not forget:’ Thousands attend funeral fallen Fredericton officers

Hundreds of officials marched in the parade, which included massed band, several police motorcycles

B.C. man designer behind Canucks’ retro jersey

Jeremie White was 20 years old when he told Canucks assistant GM Brian Burke he had a design

Lions give up late TD in 24-23 loss to Argos

B.C. falls to 3-5, fumbling away last-minute chance in Toronto

Eagle tree cut down legally a 1st for B.C. city

Planned eagle preserve ‘a first for City of Surrey’

Smoky skies like a disappearing act for sights, monuments around B.C.

Haze expected to last the next several days, Environment Canada said

Canadians react to death of former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan at age 80

Nobel Peace Prize-winning former UN leader died early Saturday following a short illness

44 drownings so far this year in B.C.

Lifesaving Society urging caution to prevent deaths while on lakes, oceans and in pools

Some of B.C.’s air quality levels worse than Jodhpur, India

Okanagan, northern B.C. seeing some of the worst air quality globally

Most Read