B.C. municipalities want convicted politicians removed from office

Terrace and Pitt Meadows UBCM resolutions also call for action upon charges being laid

Municipalities across the province backed two resolutions from Pitt Meadows and Terrace designed to have local politicians charged with serious crimes removed from office.

The similar resolutions both passed with near-unanimous support this morning at the Union of B.C. Municipalities, which is holding its convention this week in Whistler.

“As members of elected bodies, we are in positions of public trust and we should be held to a higher standard or at least the standard of your average employee,” said Terrace City Councillor Stacey Tyers, who spearheaded the Terrace resolution. “Anybody working in a public trust position is subjected to criminal record checks… you would not leave a daycare worker in their position to work with children if they were charged with abusing children.

“If they’re acquitted, they return to their seat just like any other employee would.”

The Terrace resolution, Elected Official Disqualification, requires paid leave of absence for any elected official charged with a serious crime. It also calls for their immediate disqualification from public office upon conviction. Pitt Meadows’ resolution, the Disqualification from Holding Elected Office, calls for an unpaid leave of absence only upon conviction, and disqualification from public office upon the expiration of an appeal, or determination of an appeal.

“We were asked if it was a contradiction approving both resolutions, but it gives the province more [flexibility] … it sends the message we want to talk about both charges and convictions,” Tyers said.

Currently, there is no provision in BC legislation that requires elected officials with a criminal record to resign, and no way to prevent them from continuing to hold office until the court process is complete. There are limited provisions in the charter that says elected officials can be disqualified in the event of a conflict of interest or failing to attend meetings, but not for conviction of a serious crime.

The UBCM resolutions do not prevent someone with a previous criminal record from holding public office.

“I do believe if the electorate wants to elect somebody who has a criminal record, that’s their right to do so,” Tyers said. “It’s when it happens when you’re already sitting that I’m concerned about, because the electorate has no recourse.”

Tyers first presented the Terrace resolution last March at the Northern Central Local Government Association’s annual meeting, around the same time Burns Lake Mayor Luke Strimbold was formally charged with numerous counts of sexual assault, some involving minors.

READ MORE: Former Burns Lake mayor faces 10 new sex-related charges

Pitt Meadows was also coming out of its own scandal involving former councillor David Murray who was convicted of sexual assault for molesting a 14-year-old girl in 1992. Even following his conviction, Murray could not be legally compelled to leave office.

Although Strimbold had resigned just prior to charges being laid, Murray remained on council, to which he was first elected in 2011, and attended regular meetings, as well as community events, until his conviction in October 2017 to nine months in prison. Murray is appealing both the conviction and sentence.

Tyers said the Terrace resolution is not aimed at punishing elected officials simply charged with a crime, awaiting trial, but removing the burden of public office so they can focus on their judicial proceedings, while the remaining council can focus on their elected responsibilities.

“When we look at the case of the previous mayor in Burns Lake, who is currently facing 29 charges of a variety of sexual charges and with six victims under the age of 16—he did resign, thankfully — but nothing in our legislation required him to do so,” Tyers said.

“Under the current circumstances he [could] continue to sit. Every council meeting, guaranteed, would be about his charges and not the work of the community.”

– With files from Neil Corbet (Maple Ridge News) and Brittany Gervais (Terrace Standard)


 


newsroom@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Donor of stolen Chief Dan George sculpture frustrated at middle school

Fraser River Lodge owner baffled how nobody missed it

Voters will have their say whether Mission becomes a city

Alternative approval process should begin at the end of August

Purple fentanyl among items seized in drug bust in Abbotsford

Youth being recruited as drivers for more-established drug dealers, police say

Meet Mission’s first Grand Inner Guard

Kari Senko is only the second woman elected to the Elks of Canada, grand executive

VIDEO: Daughter of slain Abbotsford Police officer speaks at charity dinner

Fay Davidson, daughter of Const. John Davidson, speaks at memorial scholarship event

Fashion Fridays: How to dress and feel powerful

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

Toronto activist calling on federal parties to nominate more black candidates

Fewer than 20 black Canadians have been nominated so far, including some Liberal MPs seeking re-election

Portland, Oregon, awaits right-wing rally, counter protests

Patriot Prayer’s Joey Gibson surrendered Friday on an arrest warrant for felony rioting

Police identify 45-year-old victim in South Surrey stabbing

Delphin Paul Prestbakmo died at the scene, near 18 Avenue and 152 Street

Kraft Heinz brand baby food recalled in B.C. due to possibility of insects

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says the product should not be consumed

First Nations women finally to be treated equally under Indian Act: Bennett

Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action thanked the feds

Helicopter-riding dog Mr. Bentley now featured on cans of new B.C.-made beer

Partial proceeds from every pack go to Children’s Wish

‘Easy Rider’ star Peter Fonda dies at 79

Actor and writer was nominated for an Oscar for co-writing the 1969 psychedelic road trip movie

Puppy rescued from smoky South Surrey condo

Fire alarms brought firefighters to the Morgan Crossing residences around 7 p.m.

Most Read