The Big Brain Literacy Project is now accessible the public across the Fraser Valley. (Submitted by Aneesha Narang)

The Big Brain Literacy Project is now accessible the public across the Fraser Valley. (Submitted by Aneesha Narang)

Financial literacy program expands across the Fraser Valley

Big Brain Literacy Program aims to help folks thwarted by the pandemic and in need of budgeting help

The world is not what it used to be since the pandemic hit.

As a consequence of the COVID-19 crisis, some folks in the Fraser Valley might need some financial help

Enter the Big Brain Literacy Program.

It was developed by UFV student Aneesha Narang last year as a community project for the Enactus club at the University of the Fraser Valley.

High school students and international students were the early focus of the Big Brain Literacy Program, but after an early flush of success it’s being expanded to the larger public around the university.

“People are having trouble with finances these days due to job losses and expected cuts,” Narang said.

The program is free of charge, and after filling out a questionnaire, they create a budget based on the participant’s expenses.

Narang is a UFV student completing a bachelor of business administration with an accounting focus, and she created the Big Brain program that has already helped more than 1,000 students manage their finances in the past year after some intense research.

“I wanted to reach out to the general public during the pandemic to see if we could help some of them as well,” Narang said.

The invitation is open to the public across the Fraser Valley.

To get some budgeting and finance help, email enactusufv@gmail.com

READ MORE: There is help out there for those who qualify

READ MORE: Province heads into unknown budget territory


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