FortisBC has adapted its BC-based school programming to support those learning from home. (FortisBC)

FortisBC program to help students learn about energy from home

Lessons challenge students to consider social, ethical, environmental implications of energy use

FortisBC has adapted its B.C. based school programming to support those learning from home.

Now, parents and teachers have 30 new ways they can teach students about energy. This new programming support students in Grades 1 to 10.

FortisBC’s Energy Leaders school program is an online platform that allows teachers to downtown complete lesson modules. Originally designed for in-class learning, there are now close to 30 modules available for home learning environments with more to be released next week. They can be easily downloaded for free.

READ MORE: Okanagan’s flood story opens new preparedness chapter

According to FortisBC, the lessons are designed by local teachers and connect with B.C.’s inquiry-based curriculum across grade levels to teach energy concepts such as the importance of energy in the world, where it comes from, how it’s used in B.C. and why it’s important to use it safely and responsibly.

“As both a parent and partner of a teacher, I have firsthand experience on how challenging it can be to find local materials that support learning at home,” said Danielle Wensink, FortisBC’s director of conservation and energy management.

“Because the Energy Leaders modules are already in line with B.C.’s curriculum, this was an ideal way for us to support parents and educators who are faced with this same challenge.”

The new distance learning materials connect to a variety of kindergarten to Grade 10 subjects including science, social studies and English, as well will look at some of the platform’s most popular modules like Climate change: Earth and its climate. Each module contains a complete set of teaching materials including a lesson plan, slides and handouts that invite students to generate and share ideas, and transfer and apply learning to new situations.

The lessons challenge students to consider the social, ethical and environmental implications of energy use.

For younger grades, caregivers can download a colouring and activity book. Designed for kindergarten and Grade 1, it introduces students to where energy comes from and the actions they can take to conserve energy with fun activities and games, like ‘Easy ways to conserve energy at home’ and the ‘Shortest Shower game’.

Parents and educators can access the modules, available for free download, without a password, from energyleaders.ca/distancelearning.

READ MORE: Problem solving a pandemic: a B.C. man on working for Doctors Without Borders in Pakistan

READ MORE: Cycling advocates say a different mindset is needed for people taking it up

@PentictonNews
editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Mission woman’s donation effort transforms into PPE distribution company

Company working with Mission Regional Chamber of Commerce to source PPE to local businesses

Mission could lose $2 million in revenue

COVID-19 having a big financial impact on residents and the district

HISTORY: How did Mission cope with the Spanish flu

In 1918, a different world-wide pandemic was being dealt with

New executive director for Fraser Valley Child Development Centre

Karen Dickenson Smith succeeds Karen McLean, who has retired after 22 years

Mission prison COVID-19 outbreak declared over

Dr. Bonnie Henry hails work done to halt outbreak, which saw more than 130 people contract COVID-19

Only four new COVID-19 cases, 228 active across B.C.

Health officials watching as activities ramp up

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The importance of accurate, ethical reporting is critical – perhaps as never before

Feds looking at ways to reunite families amid COVID-19 border restrictions with U.S.

Some families with members of dual-citizenship have become separated due to the pandemic

Condition in kids with possible COVID-19 link being studied in Canada

This month, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an alert to doctors about MIS-C

‘I knew what he wanted’: Kootenay man spends hours in tree as black bear patrols below

Francis Levasseur is no stranger to the outdoors, but a recent run-in with a bear caused quite a scare

COVID cancelled their wedding plans, so they married on a BC mountaintop

Ceremony was live streamed to friends and family around the world

Trudeau acknowledges racial unrest in U.S.; ‘We also have work to do in Canada’

‘Anti-black racism, racism, is real; it’s in the United States, but it’s also in Canada,’ Trudeau says

State of Local Emergency declared for Boundary as communities brace for river flooding

Warm weather and heavy rain could cause sections of Kettle River system to swell beyond 2018 levels

Large cruise ships barred from Canadian waters until end of October: Garneau

Last year 140 cruise ships brought more than two million visitors to Canadian ports

Most Read