Mayor-elect Darryl Walker after being named White Rock’s newest mayor. (Alex Browne photo)

Newly-elected Lower Mainland mayor won’t drink his city’s tap water

White Rock’s Darryl Walker is concerned about its quality

White Rock’s mayor-elect Darryl Walker does not drink White Rock’s tap water.

The just-elected Walker told Peace Arch News Sunday morning that he didn’t trust the water coming out of the taps in the city’s homes.

And he doesn’t think he’s alone.

“In most cases, people aren’t drinking the water. Seems to me there’s something wrong when I’m paying for the water and I’m not drinking it,” Walker said.

During the campaign, Walker’s winning slate Democracy Direct called for a full review and post-audit of all decisions made relating to the purchase and post-purchase operation of the city’s water utility. The city revealed last year that it paid $13.4 million for the water utility from Epcor.

The Democracy Direct website notes the “high levels” of arsenic and manganese in the water.

“That’s one of the other things I think we’ll look at straight away. It’s what we’ve promised the people as we’ve gone on about our platforms, our pamphlets and so on. We’re going to follow through on those things and do what we told the people we were going to do,” Walker said.

The City of White Rock and Fraser Health have maintained that White Rock water is safe to drink.

Anti-highrise slate sweeps White Rock

Walker said it was up to the citizens of White Rock to “hold our feet to the fire” after his Democracy Direct slate swept the White Rock Coalition in Saturday’s civic election.

All four of Walker’s running mates and two independent incumbents have been elected councillors, according to unofficial results. According to Civic Info BC, 6,276 residents voted out of an eligible 15,862.

The results show mayoral candidate Walker winning the seat with 1,883 (30 per cent) votes, followed by independent Mike Pearce with 1,722 (27.4 per cent) and White Rock Coalition mayoral candidate Grant Meyer with 1,319 (21 per cent) votes.

The six candidates who have unofficially won a seat in the council chambers include independent incumbent Helen Fathers with 2,801 (44.6% per cent) votes, David Chesney with 2,491 (39.7 per cent), and Democracy Direct candidates Christopher Trevelyan with 2,350 (37.4 per cent) votes, Erika Johanson with 2,137 (34.1 per cent), Scott Kristjanson with 2,024 (32.2 per cent) and Anthony Manning with 1,863 (29.7 per cent) votes.

Three White Rock Coalition incumbents – Megan Knight with 1,764 (28.1% per cent) votes, Bill Lawrence with 1,703 (27.1 per cent) and Lynne Sinclair with 1,642 (26.2 per cent) – were next but did not get elected.

In the weeks leading to voting day, Walker said it became clear that the citizens of White Rock wanted a change from the White Rock Coalition, which held four seats prior to the election.

“They’re not the council that people of White Rock trust anymore, and they have got to go and they have gone,” Walker told Peace Arch News Sunday morning. “And they have gone in an amazing, if you will, sweep.”

Democracy Direct now controls five of seven seats on council, and Walker said incumbents Fathers and Chesney are two people “that appear to care for the community.”

“I think that they did as much as they possibly could to fight for this community through a very difficult time,” Walker said.

White Rock independent incumbents David Chesney and Helen Fathers wait for poll results Sunday. (Alex Browne photo)

Last month, Walker and councillor-elect Erika Johanson submitted a 1,286-signature petition calling for a moratorium on highrises until “after the 15 highrises already approved by council have been completed.”

After Walker and Johanson presented the petition to council Sept. 17, White Rock Mayor Wayne Baldwin went on a self-described “rant” and said the petition was meaningless, disingenuous, and demonstrated a lack of knowledge that made the Democracy Direct candidates “not fit for office.”

“It was said of myself and others that we were not fit to govern,” Walker said Sunday. “Obviously, the people of this community said no, that’s wrong. We’re going to give them a chance to govern… We will move on to what we want to do, move on with our plans.”



aaron.hinks@peacearchnews.com

Visit us at peacearchnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

From left, Democracy Direct council-elects Christopher Trevelyan, Erika Johanson, Anthony Manning and Scott Kristjanson. (Alex Browne photo)

Just Posted

Mission man who nearly died from COVID-19 at Abbotsford hospital reflects on one-month battle

Robert Billyard was in an induced coma to ensure his body would not fight the ventilator to breath

Abbotsford author releases book of poetry and meditations

Sophia Campbell’s Hark Valley a depiction of her ‘spiritual journey’

Man wanted for ramming police car and almost hitting bystanders in Abbotsford

Police say Lorne Guilbault ‘engages in high-risk criminal driving behaviour’

Lavender hand sanitizer sale raises cash for Fraser Valley Health Care Foundation

Golf course and lavender farm partner up to support health care in the Fraser Valley

Cooling stations to open in Mission

Once the temperature hits 29 degrees Celsius, the stations will open

B.C. records new COVID-19 death, 85 more cases; Horgan calls on celebrity help

This brings the total number of active confirmed cases to 531 across the province

Wedding party bear sprayed at Okanagan campsite irks locals

Latest criminal activity at the Meadows leaves locals frustrated

Paramedics fired for allowing patient to crawl for treatment on Downtown Eastside: court documents

The man spent three days in intensive care and three months recovering in hospital from sepsis

Feds seeking private consultant to design firearm buyback program

The ban covers some 1,500 models and variants of what the government considers assault-style weapons

Face masks for teachers can impact learning on young children, experts say

Face coverings, mandatory in most indoor public places across the province, can help limit the spread of COVID-19

Horvat scores 2 as Vancouver Canucks beat Blues 5-2 in NHL playoff opener

Game 2 in best-of-seven series goes Friday night

Teachers to get 2 extra days to prepare for students’ return, now set for Sept. 10

Students will first start with orientation and learn rules of COVID-19 classroom policies

High-volume littering at Cape Scott draws ire from hiking groups

Popular Vancouver Island hiking spot not closing, but frustration about crowding grows

Most Read