Provincial election expenses released

NDP outspend Liberals in Maple Ridge-Mission riding

The governing BC Liberal party outspent the BC NDP by a margin of $11.75 million to $9.7 million in May’s provincial election, but in the Maple Ridge-Mission riding, the NDP was the bigger spender.

The Greens won their historic first seat in Oak Bay-Gordon Head on spending of just $180,000.

The B.C. Conservative Party listed $155,000 in expenses.

Election revenues and expenditures were released on Monday, and can be found at elections.bc.ca.

It was a close two-way race in Maple Ridge-Mission, which incumbent Liberal Marc Dalton won with 10,327 votes, while Mike Bocking of the NDP garnered 8,830. Alex Pope of the Green Party won 1,818 and BC Conservative Chad Thompson had 1,190.

Bocking listed revenues and expenditures of $105,000, mostly for salaries, office rent, newsletters and promotional material. He lists $24,000 in contributions from unions. Some of the expenses listed include the services of union members who worked on his campaign while still on a union payroll.

Bocking’s campaign cost was well up from the 2009 election, where he spent $69,000.

By comparison, Dalton showed income of $91,000 and expenditures of $73,000. His major expenditures included $21,000 for research and polling, and $23,000 for promotional material. His campaign account shows a balance of $18,000, which stays in the coffers until the next election, he said. Dalton’s spending was comparable to 2009, when he spent $74,000.

Pope’s expenditures were $2,000, including $1,100 of his own funds, and contributors from two other Green Party members. Chad Thompson spent a mere $340, which included his $250 candidates nomination deposit.

Bocking said he was campaigning “full tilt” from the beginning of March.

“It was the biggest campaign we ran locally in a long time,” he said.

Bocking now sees a need for campaign finance reform similar to what the federal government has done. He would like to see both unions and large corporations relegated to the sidelines.

Pipeline companies, fish farms, government employee unions and other groups are all exerting influence on the political system with donations, he said.

He looks at the involvement in U.S. politics of large organizations such as the National Rifle Association, the pharmaceutical industry and insurance companies, as a system of which British Columbians should be aware.

Corporate contributors gave $5 million in donations to the Liberals, followed by individuals at $2.4 million, unincorporated businesses at $420,000 and $385,000 from other sources.

The NDP got nearly $2.6 million from individuals, $2.5 million from trade unions and $2.1 million from corporations.

“Only citizens who can vote should be contributing, and only to a maximum of $1,000,” said Bocking.

That said, he made no apologies for his comparatively big-spending campaign against Dalton.

“The NDP has to compete under the rules we have now.”

Dalton said the spending limits, set at $73,000 for the writ period, and the same limit for the 60 days leading up to the dropping of the writ, means the political system is relatively accessible.

He countered that while the Liberal party spent more than the NDP during the race, some unions placed election-style ads which did not count as NDP spending, but supported their cause.

“Trade unions carry on their own publicity campaign, and that’s not part of the cap,” Dalton said.

The MLA allowed that some companies do the same for the Liberals, but “not to the extent.”

Liberal Simon Gibson won the Abbotsford-Mission riding while outspending his closest competitor, Preet Rai of the BC NDP.

Gibson ran a $59,757 campaign, while Rai’s cost $49,563.

Gibson’s highest expenditure, $22,800, was for marketing and promotional material, while Rai spent the most ($13,400) for salaries and benefits.

Green Party candidate Aird Flavelle spent $3,377 on his campaign, while BC Conservative Don Stahl spent $5,021.

With files from Mission Record

Just Posted

PHOTOS: Remembrance Day in Mission

About 1,000 people came out to this year’s ceremony

Remembrance Day: Mission soldier killed in action in 1943

Clifford John Vosper Kettley’s Halifax aircraft was shot down over Holland

Chicken Soup for the Soul author to speak in Abbotsford

Frances McGuckin at House of James on Nov. 14

Mission’s latest crime stats tell confusing story

New method of recording incidents has boosted some numbers, year needed for proper comparisons

Abbotsford’s Remembrance Days in 1939 and 1945 through historical archives

Abbotsford News reporting shows the anxieties of people living through conflict

VIDEO: Hong Kong police shoot protester, man set on fire

It was the second protester shot since the demonstrations began in early June

Sportsnet fires Don Cherry after negative comments about immigrants

Don Cherry had said immigrants don’t wear poppies like other Canadians do

Trudeau’s new cabinet: Gender parity because it’s 2019? Or due to competence?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will soon appoint his new cabinet

Coquihalla drivers urged to be careful amid freezing rain alert

Special weather statement in effect for highways between Hope, Merritt, Kamloops and Kelowna

Canada among three G20 countries least likely to hit emissions targets

It says Canada, South Korea and Australia are the farthest off

Conservatives’ Scheer wants Trudeau to open Parliament Nov. 25

That’s five days after Justin Trudeau is scheduled to swear in a new cabinet

14 SeaBus cancellations, free rides for veterans from TransLink on Remembrance Day

Free rides also available for current Armed Forces members, first responders

Last remaining Centurion tank from the Korean War makes its journey ‘home’ to B.C.

Tank arrives in B.C. the day before Remembrance Day after a more than 4,500-kilometre transfer

‘Your vehicle burns a lot of fuel:’ Victoria drivers wake up to angry notes

‘This handbill was left on your vehicle because your vehicle burns a lot of fuel,’ notes read

Most Read