Two delegations recently voiced concerns to council regarding the fate of Fraser River Heritage Park (above) and the closing of Mission's animal shelter.

Two delegations recently voiced concerns to council regarding the fate of Fraser River Heritage Park (above) and the closing of Mission's animal shelter.

Public voices concerns to Mission council

Delegations speak against animal control changes and fate of Fraser River Heritage Park.

A pair of delegations spoke before Mission council expressing concerns regarding recent decisions.

Two weeks ago, Abbotsford resident Diane Davies addressed council regarding the pending closure of the Mission animal shelter in favour of joining the Fraser Valley Regional District’s animal control services.

Davies said she represented the views of more than 800 Mission residents.

“We want to make you aware that we are not in favour of this move … We also do not like that FVRD will be allowed to take over the contract without our mayor and council at least appointing a staff member to ensure the safety of our animals.”

She raised concerns that the FVRD continues to accept contracts for dog control while not having large enough facilities to accommodate their ambitions. Davies asked council to revisit the decision.

She suggested council could lease the Mission property to FVRD. The Mission shelter could then be renovated and a contractor could be hired by FVRD.

“To show that we, the taxpayers of Mission, care we also offer $10,000 to assist in putting Mission on the map as having an animal shelter worth visiting.”

On Monday, George Evens spoke before council to voice his disapproval of the Fraser River Heritage Park situation. Council has decided not to renew its contract with the Mission Heritage Association, which has maintained the park for the past 30 years. Council also decided to cancel the observatory project, also located at the park.

“Any citizen may be hard-pressed to not ask, ‘How dare you council act without perceived due diligence and lacking vision and in a perceived in-camera and too secretive manner, dismiss our fellow dedicated volunteers and board without prior consultations in a perceived cavalier manner.”’

Evens said the move to end the contract could expose Mission citizens to new and possibly costly governance.

He said countless hours of volunteer work and fundraising efforts by the association has helped maintain the park.

Evens called council’s action counter-productive to the public interest and said council is over-reactionary and uncompromising in its dealing with the association.

Both delegations were received by council without comment.

 

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