Lisa Deanne Batstone was found guilty in March of second-degree murder in connection with her daughter Teagan’s December 2014 death. (File photo)

Lisa Deanne Batstone was found guilty in March of second-degree murder in connection with her daughter Teagan’s December 2014 death. (File photo)

Surrey mother who smothered daughter to learn parole ineligibility today

Lisa Batstone was convicted of second-degree murder in March

The South Surrey mother who smothered her eight-year-old daughter to death with a plastic bag is to learn today just how long she will have to wait to apply for parole.

Lisa Batstone was convicted in March of second-degree murder in connection with the December 2014 death of young Teagan. The conviction comes with an automatic life sentence.

In finding Lisa Batstone guilty of the crime, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Catherine Murray described the mother’s actions as “purposeful and goal-driven.”

READ MORE: South Surrey mother guilty of second-degree murder in death of daughter

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“The whole of the evidence points to only one inference,” Murray said. “When the accused smothered her daughter… whatever the motive… the only possible inference is that her intent was to end Teagan’s life.”

At a hearing in June, prosecutor Christopher McPherson argued Batstone should be ineligible for parole for 16 to 18 years; defence counsel Rebecca McConchie submitted an ineligibility term of 10 years was appropriate.

Teagan’s dad, Gabe Batstone, said following the hearing that he would like to see his ex-wife “spend the rest of her life” in custody.

Today’s proceedings are set to get underway at 10 a.m. in New Westminster.

 

Gabe Batstone with one of two photos of his daughter, Teagan, that he shared with Justice Catherine Murray during the June parole ineligibility hearing in B.C. Supreme Court, as part of his victim-impact statement. (File photo)

Gabe Batstone with one of two photos of his daughter, Teagan, that he shared with Justice Catherine Murray during the June parole ineligibility hearing in B.C. Supreme Court, as part of his victim-impact statement. (File photo)