VIDEO: Tofino council apologizes for 1947 motion to ‘exclude Orientals’

Josie Osborne earned an emotional standing ovation inside the Clayoquot Sound Community Theatre.

Tofino mayor Josie Osborne earned an emotional standing ovation inside the Clayoquot Sound Community Theatre on Tuesday when she formally apologized on behalf of the town’s council for a motion made in 1947 to “exclude Orientals” from the community.

“I’m speechless,” Mary Kimoto told the Westerly News outside the theatre. “It’s finally happened and I’m just speechless.”

Mary moved to the West Coast with her husband Tom in 1951. Tom had been a fisherman in Tofino when he was forcibly removed during Japanese-Canadian Internment in 1942. The family had intended to resettle in Tofino, but found too much tension against Japanese Canadians so they moved to Ucluelet instead.

“My father couldn’t come back to Clayoquot to resettle,” said Doug Kimoto, Mary and Tom’s son, who was 10 months old when the family returned to B.C.

“This is an apology for all the families that lived here years ago and reconciliation for the Japanese community,” Doug told the Westerly. “It’s righting a wrong that maybe should have been done years ago…It took a lot of will to do this. A lot of previous councils kind of swept it under the rug.”

The 1947 motion read, “The Commissioners of the Corporation of the Village of Tofino, hereby resolve-That at the request of the residents of the Village of Tofino, all orientals be excluded completely from this Municipality, and shall be prevented from owning property or carrying on business directly or indirectly within the Municipality.”

Tofino did not have a municipal council at the time and was led by commissioners. The motion was never formally passed but, Osborne noted, in 1949 the commissioners directed their clerk to look into “whether a bylaw could be made to exclude Orientals from buying or owning property within the municipality.”

She added that Tofino’s council rescinded the motion in 1997, but a formal apology was not made.

“Today, we are here to declare the District of Tofino Council takes full responsibility for its actions of 1947 and 1949 and we acknowledge that the words, actions and intentions of the past, both spoken and unspoken, caused harm and suffering,” she said. “We regret these and today we offer a formal and sincere apology to Japanese Canadians, all persons of Asian descent and to all others affected by our actions. We reject any exclusionary policy based on racial or ethnic origins and we make a solemn commitment that such injustices will never again be countenanced.”

Osborne added that the public apology should serve as a call to action.

“We call upon the witnesses here present to tell others about what you saw and heard today,” she said. “We call upon all present to embrace the shared responsibility to uphold the principles of human rights, justice and equality today and into the future. Let this event be a catalyst to increase public understanding and dialogue on how and why injustices such as those of Tofino’s past must never happen again.”

Prior to the apology, Osborne offered a historical perspective provided by the National Association of Japanese Canadians.

“In 1941, Japanese Canadians in Tofino were affected by the bombing of Pearl Harbour and the war with Japan. On Dec. 15, 1941, their fishing boats were rounded up and confiscated. Japanese Canadians were labeled enemy aliens, despite the fact that the military advised they were no threat to the country,” she said. “In 1942, they were given 24 hours notice to gather belongings and move from their homes in Tofino, eventually taken by ferry to Vancouver’s Hastings Park; a horse stable reeking of manure and urine that was converted into sleeping quarters where they stayed until they were moved into the interior of B.C. and to internment camps.”

Isabel Kimoto was a 19-year-old living in Tofino in 1942.

“I remember police just pushed the door open and took the radio,” she told the Westerly News in a 2012 interview. “My husband was a fisherman and his boat was anchored in the ocean in front of the house, they beached the boat and then, around Christmas time, all the Japanese fisherman had to move their boats to New Westminster.”

Isabel passed away in 2015. Her daughter Ellen, who was three months old when her family was forced out of their West Coast home, attended Tuesday’s apology.

“I think how [my mother] would have put it, if she had been around, she would have said, ‘We were pushed around a lot during those days and this apology pushes back.’ I think that’s what she would have said,” Ellen told the Westerly.

She added the apology was a “bittersweet” event.

“The sweetest part was Josie’s apology. I think that was heartfelt and emotional. I think she put a lot of herself into it and I liked the way she ended the apology with a call for people to get along with each other,” she said. “The apology made me hopeful and optimistic. On the other hand, the bitter part was that the people who really suffered weren’t there to hear it, because the apology took so long in coming. My mom and all her age group; they’re all gone.”



andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

READ MORE: Investigation into the impacts of Japanese internment

READ MORE: Tofino council plans apology for 1947 motion to ‘exclude Orientals’

READ MORE: Tofino museum hosts Japanese Heritage Walking Tours this weekend

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A Rick Hansen Secondary School student died in hospital after suffering a medical incident in class on Monday. (File photo)
Abbotsford student dies after medical incident in class

Rick Hansen Secondary School offering additional counselling for students who require it

Stock photo
$93,000 in COVID-19 emergency support available to Abbotsford charities

Applications now open for grants through community foundation

The RCMP helicopter. (File photo)
Suspect escapes after police pursuit through Surrey, Langley, Abbotsford

Police chase involved two stolen vehicles, including one taken in Mission

The Rotary Club of Chilliwack Book Sale is moves from the Chilliwack Mall to allow for physical distancing. (Jenna Hauck/ The Progress file)
Rotary Book Sale moves from Chilliwack Mall to Heritage Park

The hugely-popular book sale is going ahead Oct. 25-31 with pandemic protocols in place

FILE – People wait in line at a COVID-19 testing facility in Burnaby, B.C., on Thursday, August 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
167 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death recorded as B.C. enters 2nd wave

Three new healthcare outbreaks also announced

This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 particle isolated from a patient, in a laboratory in Fort Detrick, Md. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-NIAID/NIH via AP
At least 49 cases of COVID-19 linked to wedding in Calgary: Alberta Health

McMillan says the city of Calgary has recently seen several outbreaks linked to social gatherings

UBC geoscientists discovered the wreckage of a decades-old crash during an expedition on a mountain near Harrison Lake. (Submitted photo)
Wreckage of possibly decades-old airplane crash discovered on mountain near Harrison Lake

A team of UBC geoscientists discovered the twisted metal embedded in a glacier

Officers with the Lower Mainland Emergency Response Team were at a White Rock home Tuesday (Oct. 20) to assist Vancouver Police Department with execution of a search warrant. (Contributed photo)
ERT, VPD response to White Rock home connected to homicide: police

Search underway in the 15800-block of Prospect Crescent

The official search to locate Jordan Naterer was suspended Saturday Oct. 17. Photo courtesy of VPD.
‘I am not leaving without my son,’ says mother of missing Manning Park hiker

Family and friends continue to search for Jordan Naterer, after official efforts suspended

A bear similar to this black bear is believed responsible for killing a llama in Saanich on Oct. 19. (Black Press Media file photo)
Bear kills llama on Vancouver Island, prompting concerns over livestock

Officers could not track the bear they feel may not fear humans

Bernard Trest and his son Max, 10, are concerned about B.C.’s plan for students in the classroom. He was one of two fathers who filed a court application in August to prevent schools from reopening if stricter COVID-19 protections weren’t in place. That application was dismissed last week. (Contributed photo)
B.C. dad pledges to appeal quashed call for mandatory masks, distancing in schools

Bernard Trest and Gary Shuster challenged health, education ministries’ return-to-school plan

RCMP crest. (Black Press Media files)
RCMP cleared in fatal shooting of armed Lytton man in distress, police watchdog finds

IIO spoke to seven civillian witnesses and 11 police officers in coming to its decision

A 34-year-old man was treated for a gunshot wound in Williams Lake Monday, Oct 19, 2020. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Williams Lake man treated for gunshot wound after accidental shooting: RCMP

Police are reminding residents to ensure firearms are not loaded when handling them

Most Read