Cast your vote

Voting is a privilege; even spoiled ballots send a message

Editor, The Record:

I have lived and worked in Mission for over 20 years now, and have usually been proud to say I am from here. I never say I am from Vancouver when travelling and am proud to tell people world-wide where Mission is.

I have rarely been embarrassed, but for the first time I am ashamed of Mission.  Fifty-one to 53 per cent of Mission voters actually get out and vote. That is disgraceful.  In my time in Mission, 100 per cent of the adults have complained about some government policy or procedure.

Considering more than one million people put on their shoes and pick up their gun today to fight for the right to vote, how can we defend not exercising our voting privilege?

If your issue is that you don’t like any of the candidates, then let them know. Spoil your ballot — it still counts as a ballot cast.  If 49 per cent of the voters voted “none of the above” or “you all suck” that would have the most profound impact on Canadian politics in history; spoiled ballots would actually be the winning party.

And given that the new  ballots are in black with white circles, to take away even that form of protest, you can still write your message in all the circles or simply check all the circles— it spoils the ballot and still counts as a ballot cast.

Never lose your right to vote — if no one has earned your vote, let them know that too. That is more powerful than not voting, for which there is generally no excuse.

 

Al LaFontaine

Mission