Some schools already teach ‘traditional’ values

Wearing a uniform won't change who the child is inside

Editor, The Record:

Re: Traditional school forum draws about 50 people, Nov. 22 edition.

I find it interesting that the parents at this forum almost universally stated that uniforms were at the top of their list of expectations.

I am very pleased to discover, after reading this article, that because I operate a classroom that has a high level of accountability for actions and expects a high level of respect shown for each other, I must be in a fairly “traditional” classroom.

My colleagues are of a very similar “school of thought” in expecting accountability and respect, so I can only conclude that I am in a “traditional school.” Ooops! Except for the uniform.

If dressing my students, and perhaps even myself, all the same would complete the traditional stereotype bill, then let’s go shopping! The fact is, however, that what you put on in the morning does not equal who you are inside and how you treat others. I come from a small town where the traditional school students indeed wore uniforms, and an equal share of their students were amongst the small minority of rule-breakers that our town had. Their uniforms didn’t stop them from being who they really were inside.

I am proud to teach at Christine Morrison Elementary School, where we do our best to uphold our own “traditional” values. In my room, our five rules sum up our version of “traditional:” be gentle, be kind, be polite, be tidy, be honest. “Be Dressed Like Each Other” might make choosing one’s wardrobe easier, but it doesn’t have anything to do with respect, which I feel is the best tradition of all.

Michael Ross

Mission