FISHING COLUMN: Are scent lures ethical

One of the things I like about writing sport fishing columns is bringing out the controversial stuff. One of these controversial subjects is the use of attractants (fish luring scents).

One of the things I like about writing sport fishing columns is bringing out the controversial stuff. One of these controversial subjects is the use of attractants (fish luring scents).

There is no doubt that attractants work and work well. Field tests across the board by many of the popular manufacturers have proven that treated lures (flies included) out fish untreated lures by a ratio of four to one. The reason is that a fish’s keen sense of smell, which is three and a half time greater than of a dog. Scientific studies have shown this keen sense of smell is accurate in detecting amino acids diluted up to one part per ten million.

The controversy comes into play when the questions are asked: What scents work?  What scents don’t work? Is it ethical to use scent?

Aside from the controversial debate, there is another factor that needs to be considered – repellents. If certain scents attract, others must then repel.

It has been said that petroleum-base materials repel fish, yet the late Charley White maintained that bilge water is one of the best salmon attractors. Citrus is undisputedly one of the worst, as is Deet. L-Serine, an amino acid that can be emitted through human skin is another offender but can be eliminated by simple hand washing.

Ethical or not, attractants work and one of the best is WD-40. Do I use them? No, I find them another unneeded expense. As a cost conscious angler my advice is, just wash your hands.

 

The report

 

Fishing on our Lower Mainland lakes is AAA. For wet (sinking) fly fishing try: Chironomid, Bloodworm, Coachman, American Coachman, Professor, Wooly Bugger, Micro Leach, Sixpack, Dragonfly Nymph, Halfback, Doc Spratley, Baggy Shrimp, or Zulu.

For dry (floating) fly action try: Tom Thumb, Irresistible, Black Gnat, Griffith Gnat, Royal Coachman, or Renegade. For Kokanee try: Red Abbis, Bloodworm, Red Spratley, San Juan Worm, Red Quill, or Double Trude.

Our Lower Mainland bass and panfish fisheries are good also. For bass try: Wooly bugger, Big Black, Lizard, Clouser’s Deep Minnow, Zonker, Tied Down Minnow, Bucktail, Dolly Whacker, or Crayfish, in sizes 4 to 1.  For Crappie or Pumpkinseed try: Wooly Bugger, Big Black, Micro Leach, Bucktail, Tied Down Minnow, Dolly Whacker, or Clouser’s Deep Minnow in sizes 12 to 8.

Fishing is fair to good on our lakes. For wet fly fishing try: Wooly Bugger, Micro Leach, Egg Sucking Leach, Chironomid, Bloodworm, Pumpkinhead, Dragonfly Nymph, Halfback Nymph, 52 Buick. Doc Spratley, Green Spratley, or Baggy Shrimp. For dry fly on warm afternoons try: Irresistible, Black Gnat, Griffith Gnat, Tom Thumb, Renegade, Double Hackled Peacock, Goddard Caddis, or Elk Hair Caddis.

You can find more at “The Reel Life Press” by Jeff Weltz