Bag to Earth is a Canadian company that creates 100 per cent compostable – and plastic-free – paper food waste bags. It’s the easy, mess-free way to get your kitchen compostables to your curb-side cart.

If you compost kitchen scraps, you gotta try this bag!

Canadian-made, fully compostable plastic-free bag makes composting a breeze

You want to do your part by collecting your kitchen scraps for composting, but don’t like the mess in your kitchen container or your municipal collection cart. You also want to know that any bag you use to keep things tidy is in fact 100 per cent compostable.

Luckily there’s a solution – one that makes composting quick, simple and clean! Even better, the ingenious product comes from a Canadian company.

Bag to Earth creates 100 per cent compostable paper food waste bags to divert organic waste.

The Canadian company, which has been manufacturing Kraft paper packaging products since 1946, turned to sustainable product development and landfill diversion solutions in the 1980s.

“Since 1985, we’ve been dedicated to creating the best earth-safe, 100-per-cent-compostable waste bag in all of North America,” says Jennifer Duncan, Regional Account & Retail Supervisor with Bag to Earth. “We’ve committed to using natural and renewable resources that are regenerated in sustainably managed forests, unlike some that line their bags with plastic coating.”

Why bags?

“People were really tired of messy kitchen compost cans,” Duncan explains. “With this bag, you can sit it on your counter, add your compostables to it, then fold it over and pop it into your green cart – no mess! Condo and apartment residents love that they don’t have to haul containers up and down – they can simply drop their bag in their building’s compost bin on their way out.”

Bag to Earth bags are lined with natural cellulose fibre that not only blocks leaks, but also makes the bags 100 per cent paper, 100 per cent compostable, and approved in all residential curbside collection programs. Bags with plastic liners and all types of compostable plastic bags often aren’t accepted as they don’t fully disappear, but simply break down into smaller particles (always refer to your municipality’s website for local details).

Not only sustainable, but good for the earth

Bag to Earth’s environmentally sustainable products not only preserve, but enrich the environment as bags return to the earth, adding nutrients to the composting process.

“All of our paper products are plastic-free and 100 per cent compostable, disappearing fully into the earth and completing the organic loop,” Duncan says.

“And all materials in our bags – paper, glue and vegetable-based inks – are fully compostable. It’s all part of our commitment to not only preserve, but also enrich, the environment.”

Building on its longevity in the industry, the company continues to work with retailers, municipalities and customers to create products that make sense for the earth AND consumers.

What to look for:

When shopping, be sure to look for bags that are plastic-free, 100 per cent compostable, and made in Canada.

Bag to Earth bags come in various sizes, and with numerous retailers stocking the innovative product in the garbage bag aisle, visit online to discover where you can get your Bag to Earth compostable bags today!

Stay up to date with the latest happenings at bagtoearth.ca

 

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