Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives to a caucus meeting on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives to a caucus meeting on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)

Trudeau’s minority Liberal government survives first confidence vote

Trudeau’s Liberals won 157 seats in the Oct. 21 election, 13 short of a majority in the 338-seat House

Justin Trudeau’s Liberals survived Tuesday their first test of confidence in the House of Commons but got a pointed reminder of how opposition parties can still make life complicated for a minority government.

Conservatives mustered the support of other opposition parties to pass a motion calling for the creation of a special parliamentary committee to examine Canada’s fraught relationship with China.

The motion authorizes the committee to order the prime minister, Foreign Affairs Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne, Public Safety Minister Bill Blair and Canada’s ambassador to China, Dominic Barton, to appear as witnesses “from time to time as the committee sees fit.”

But while that could tie up Trudeau and his ministers and dwell on sensitive diplomatic and trade conflicts with China that the Liberals would prefer to deal with outside the public spotlight, they will at least get to continue governing.

The Liberals, with the support of all opposition MPs but the Conservatives and one Green MP, passed a series of votes on supplementary spending estimates. The estimates passed on a vote of 205-116, ensuring that previously planned government programs get the funding they need to operate.

Any vote involving money is traditionally considered a matter of confidence. A government that cannot command the confidence of the Commons is deemed to have been defeated.

Trudeau’s Liberals won 157 seats in the Oct. 21 election, 13 short of a majority in the 338-seat House.

They must, therefore, garner the support of at least one of the Conservative, Bloc and New Democrat parties in order to pass legislation and survive tests of confidence.

On Tuesday, the Conservatives, who have signalled their intention to bring down the government as soon as possible, voted en masse against the estimates. They were joined by one of two Green MPs in the Commons, Paul Manly.

Bloc Quebecois and New Democrat MPs supported the estimates. They were joined by Green MP Jenica Atwin and lone Independent MP Jody Wilson-Raybould, a former Liberal who resigned from Trudeau’s cabinet earlier this year over the SNC-Lavalin affair.

All opposition MPs supported the Conservative motion to create a special committee to examine the Canada-China relationship, which passed by a vote of 171-148. The committee is to consist of six Liberals, four Conservatives, one Bloc Quebecois and one New Democrat. Since one Liberal is to chair the committee and would vote only in the case of a tie, the combined opposition members will outnumber the government members.

Conservative foreign affairs critic Erin O’Toole made it clear the objective of his party is not simply to delve more deeply into the issues creating conflict between Canada and China but to cast a light on all Trudeau’s misadventures on the world stage.

“Why do we bring this debate on our first opposition motion? Because we have had serious concerns with the Prime Minister’s ability to govern in Canada’s national interest on the world stage,” O’Toole told the Commons.

“Literally, all Canadians now have no confidence in the Prime Minister when he goes abroad.”

ALSO WATCH: SNL skewers Trudeau’s mockery of Trump in high school cafeteria sketch

He referenced Trudeau’s ill-fated trip to India in 2018 and last week’s gaffe at the NATO summit, where Trudeau was caught by a live microphone laughing about U.S. President Donald Trump’s behaviour.

International Co-operation Minister Karina Gould suggested the Conservatives were playing political games with a serious situation and argued that existing parliamentary committees could do the same job of examining the relationship with China.

Bloc Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet acknowledged that political games were afoot and that the wording of the motion — implying that Trudeau and his ministers could be called multiple times to testify — seemed designed to ensure Liberals would not support it. Nevertheless, he said his 31 MPs supported the motion because it’s important that the government be accountable for Canada’s “highly uncertain” relationship with China.

The relationship went into a tailspin a year ago, following Canada’s arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou at the behest of the United States, which wants to extradite her on fraud charges related to U.S. sanctions against Iran.

In what was widely seen as retaliatory moves, China detained two Canadian citizens, Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, who remain imprisoned without access to lawyers or their families.

On Tuesday, a Chinese foreign-ministry spokeswoman in Beijing said the two men’s cases have been sent “for investigation and prosecution” on national-security allegations.

China has also imposed a ban on Canadian canola and soybeans and had temporarily thrown up a barrier to imports of Canadian pork and beef.

Joan Bryden, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Elsie Hellstrom (top left), Mary Gjernes (top right), Stan Moore (bottom left) and Evelina Walter all celebrated their birthdays this month. All photos courtesy of Brittany Siemens.
Mission seniors residence celebrates 4 centenarian birthdays this month

Special party honouring a combined 405 years of life held on Jan. 25

A Chilliwack driver’s vehicle was impounded for seven days after an excessive speeding violation. (RCMP photo)
RCMP catch Chilliwack driver doing 60 km/h over posted speed limit

The motorist was hit with a big ticket and a seven day vehicle impoundment

Abbotsford Police is investigating after bullet casings were found following a shots fired call at the intersection of Purcell Avenue and Wells Gray Avenue on Tuesday night. (File photo)
Bullet casings found after shots-fired call in Abbotsford on Tuesday

Abbotsford Police Department seeking witnesses and CCTV footage following shooting

UFV assistant kinesiology professor Dr. Iris Lesser exercises along Chilliwack's Vedder Rotary Trail with her daughter Kaia. (UFV photo)
UFV study finds women with reduced physical activity had more mental health struggles during COVID pandemic

The study suggested women suffered more than men as gyms, parks and playgrounds shut down

Hatzic Middle school has had the most COVID-19 exposures in the district. File photo.
COVID-19 exposure at Hatzic Middle

Exposure occurred on Jan. 19

British Columbia Health Minister Adrian Dix looks on as Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry addresses the media during a news conference at the BC Centre of Disease Control in Vancouver B.C. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)
B.C. announces 485 new COVID-19 cases, fewest deaths in months

‘The actions we take may seem small, but will have a big impact to stop the virus,” urges Dr. Henry

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News
Search called off for small plane that went down in rough water south of Victoria

Plane bound for Port Angeles from Alaska believed to have one occupant, an Alaskan pilot

BC Place Stadium in a photo posted to cisc-icca.ca.
Roof of BC Place a stage for performers during online music festival

‘This will be the first time any artists have performed from the 204-foot iconic Vancouver rooftop’

Royal B.C. Museum conservator Megan Doxsey-Whitfield kneels next to a carved stone pillar believed to have significance as a First Nations cultural marker by local Indigenous people. The pillar was discovered on the beach at Dallas Road last summer. Museum curatorial staff have been working with Songhees and Esquimalt Nation representatives to gain a clearer picture of its use. (Photo courtesy Royal BC Museum)
Stone carving found on Victoria beach confirmed Indigenous ritual pillar

Discussion underway with the Esquimalt and Songhees about suitable final home for the artifact

RCMP. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)
Driver crashes vehicle twice in one day near Princeton

Abbotsford woman, 29, wasn’t injured in either incident

Former Vancouver Giants forward Evander Kane is seen here in Game 7 of the second round of the 2009 WHL playoffs against the Spokane Chiefs (Sam Chan under Wikipedia Commons licence)
Gambling debts revealed in details of bankruptcy filing by hockey star Evander Kane

Sharks left winger and former Vancouver Giants player owes close to $30 million total

Othman “Adam” Hamdan, pictured in front of Christina Lake’s Welcome Centre, was acquitted of terrorism related charges in 2017. He has been living in Christina Lake since November 2020. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Man acquitted on terrorism charges awaits deportation trial while living in Kootenays

Othman Ayed Hamdan said he wants to lead a normal life while he works on his upcoming book

B.C. Premier John Horgan wears a protective face mask to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 prior to being sworn in by The Honourable Janet Austin, Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia during a virtual swearing in ceremony in Victoria, Thursday, November 26, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Premier Horgan calls jumping COVID vaccine queue ‘un-Canadian’

Horgan says most people in B.C. are doing their best to follow current public health guidelines

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, and Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart share a laugh while speaking to the media before sitting down for a meeting at City Hall, in Vancouver, on Friday August 30, 2019. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)
Vancouver mayor, Health Canada to formally discuss drug decriminalization

Kennedy Stewart says he’s encouraged by the federal health minister’s commitment to work with the city

Most Read