Female staff at Boston Pizza at 1045 Columbia Street were asked to conform to a sexist dress code, according UFCW 1518 president Kim Novak, (Google Maps)

Female staff at Boston Pizza at 1045 Columbia Street were asked to conform to a sexist dress code, according UFCW 1518 president Kim Novak, (Google Maps)

Women told to wear skirts at Lower Mainland Boston Pizza, union says

As of Monday, management at the New Westminster restaurant had not taken conciliatory action

It all started on International Women’s Day, March 8.

Women working at a New Westminster Boston Pizza were allegedly told they were required to wear skirts – something the company says was a “miscommunication.”

The allegations were shared Monday (March 15) by United Food and Commercial Workers 1518, which is in the midst of a union drive at the 1045 Columbia Street restaurant.

“Boston Pizza franchise owners have implemented a ‘skirt policy’ that is not only sexist, it objectifies women in their workplace,” stated UFCW 1518 president Kim Novak.

“This policy needs to end now. We are calling on Boston Pizza to ensure that none of their locations ever institutes sexist dress code policies again.”

The union was alerted to the skirt mandate by several female staff who had attempted to resolve the issue themselves by bringing it up to management.

READ MORE: B.C. teen in turtleneck, lace-edged dress sent home from school for ‘inappropriate’ outfit

Their requests were ignored, Novak related. Previously, employees had been told the restaurant’s policy only required that they wear black.

“The full breadth of the Boston Pizza Dress Code and Grooming Policy was miscommunicated to staff during a recent change in franchise ownership,” said Marian Raty, spokesperson of Boston Pizza International.

Raty told Black Press Media that corporate policy remains that employees are allowed an array of “appropriate styles and options,” including formal pants, dresses and skirts.

“Steps are being taken to ensure staff is aware of the full policy going forward,” she said.

As of Monday, restaurant management had not taken action to reverse the sexist policy, Novak said.

Employees voted Tuesday on whether or not to unionize.

READ MORE: Whole Foods reverses poppy ban for workers following heavy criticism



sarah.grochowski@bpdigital.ca

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